Tips for Caring for Your Vintage Car

(ARA) - Caring for a vintage car takes a bit more time and effort than maintaining a car built today. Materials like leather, rubber and even the metal parts, need extra TLC to keep them from wearing out and cracking from age and sunlight damage.

Here are a few basic tips to help keep your old auto looking its best.

Storage
Keep it out of the elements. Freezing temperatures and sunlight do the most damage. While in the garage, it also helps to keep it covered and closed up to reduce the dust build up and to keep out the critters and bugs who may want to set up house in the seat cushions. If you live in a cold climate, you may want to connect it to an engine warmer if you plan on starting it up, to keep the battery alive.

Leather Care and Rubber
Like skin, all soft materials need moisturizing now and again. Old cars’ leather interiors need special care and cleaning and so does the rubber, and not just the tires. Hoses and all rubber parts need lubricants and moisturizers to keep them supple, strong and in tact.

Finding the Right Parts
Replacing vintage parts is not as easy as it sounds. While you may think finding any new replacement part may work, but keeping it in line with the make, model and year of your car keeps the auto’s value higher than if you replace your parts with dissimilar car parts.

Protect Your Engine
The new levels of ethanol in gasoline may have adverse effects on the metals in your car’s antique engine. Older engines were designed to run on straight gasoline, and using ethanol without protection may cause corrosion of some metals in the engine. It also may damage natural rubber and cork parts.

Things You can Do:

* Run a non-alcohol based fuel stabilizer like STA-BIL year-round. These older engines were designed primarily for straight gasoline, and using ethanol without protection may cause corrosion of some metals in the engine. It also may damage natural rubber and cork parts. “STA-BIL Brand Fuel Stabilizer contains additives to protect against rust and corrosion caused by ethanol fuel blends,” notes Tom Wicks, project engineering manager for Gold Eagle Co.

* Install a water separation filter and fuel filter -- keep spare filters on hand.

* Replace fuel lines and gaskets or o-rings with new ethanol resistant materials.

* Repair or replace the fuel tank if it has been damaged.

Many old cars owners tend to baby their vehicle and therefore don’t take it out very often. While it’s good to keep the mileage low, it’s important to get the engine’s RPMs running high. This cleans out the carburetor, valves and circulates oil and helps the engine run better, longer. So take your vintage beauty out on the highway and get it up to speed. With all your special care, you’ll want to show it off.

For more information on caring for your vintage auto, log on to www.sta-bil.com.

Courtesy of ARAcontent





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